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Froglet

Advice re child who repeats phrases/noises.

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Great info in your post upsy daisy what a shame that information from the childs education settings are not included. We have just spent two years trying to persuade a parent to go to the paediatrician who then said there were no issues because Mum said he was fine! His assessment was a half hour of having a chat (the child talking about the subjects that interest him) and doing some puzzles/ games 1-1 quiet room Mum there. If only the specialist had asked what our concerns were he may have got a much clearer picture ! He is now going to school in September and the school has already requested another referral SURPRISE!

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Great info in your post upsy daisy what a shame that information from the childs education settings are not included. We have just spent two years trying to persuade a parent to go to the paediatrician who then said there were no issues because Mum said he was fine! His assessment was a half hour of having a chat (the child talking about the subjects that interest him) and doing some puzzles/ games 1-1 quiet room Mum there. If only the specialist had asked what our concerns were he may have got a much clearer picture ! He is now going to school in September and the school has already requested another referral SURPRISE!

 

That's such a shame.

 

I've been in touch with dozens of parents whose children were undergoing these assessments and a common thread has been the requirement that observations and assessment to some degree are carried out in the educational setting. It doesn't sound like your little one was allowed to get that far.

 

In fact, a much more common issue occurs when children mask their difficulties in the educational setting and the staff report that the child has no problem while parents are dealing with horrific meltdowns, anxiety, self harm, etc at home resulting from inadequate provision in school. I know of many children who have been denied a much needed diagnosis quite wrongly because school have said they are fine, only for a later assessment to result in a diagnosis. Sadly that has meant those children sometimes missing out on years of support.

 

I think there are some GPs and paediatricians who could do with a bit of a refresher course on the diagnosis of ASD.

 

I hope the paediatrician thinks a bit more carefully the second time around and refers him for a full assessment.

 

 

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I'm shocked at that HV diagnosing autism because they can't build! That's disgraceful!

 

Autism diagnosis takes a hell of a long time. I had a key child at my last setting who I swore blind from day 1 that he was on the spectrum and it took us a 2 year battle to finally get him diagnosed. He now attends a special school and is absolutely thriving (mum and I are friends on Facebook and she gives me little updates).

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Great info in your post upsy daisy what a shame that information from the childs education settings are not included. We have just spent two years trying to persuade a parent to go to the paediatrician who then said there were no issues because Mum said he was fine! His assessment was a half hour of having a chat (the child talking about the subjects that interest him) and doing some puzzles/ games 1-1 quiet room Mum there. If only the specialist had asked what our concerns were he may have got a much clearer picture ! He is now going to school in September and the school has already requested another referral SURPRISE!

We have just gone through a similar situation..only the paediatrician in this case didn't even talk to the child at all. She was with the nursery nurse at the other end of the clinic while he chatted to mum and dad. He was cleverly able to diagnose all was fine in his report. This despite the 18 months worth of PCP's and reports we had complied and sent to him in advance of the meeting.

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I do wonder what we have to do to get professionals to treat us as professionals too and accept that my 18 years of childcare and development might just mean I know what i'm talking about sometimes! I go to every multiagency meeting I can in order to promote pre-school and just what we do. We are no longer just pre-school! unfortunately there is still a lot of misinformation out there especially in the press!

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We have spent a year trying to support a child within normal ratios, I've come to realise we will never be treated as 'knowing what we are talking about' or even acknowledged that we made the right call, yet all you hear is 'early intervention' ....it really saddens me after the year we've had :'(

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I sometimes wonder what 'early intervention; actually means....to my mind I would say that it should mean intervention and support at the earliest possible time (from birth if possible) but it appears that certainly in my borough early intervention kicks in after year 1!

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So frustrating when you know a child needs additional input but there are such long delays in getting it. I'm still reeling from the news that our SLT has reduced to 2 (yes that's right, 2) sessions. This time last year it was 6 and then cut to 4 earlier this year. It is atrocious as it all falls back on settings and parents, and we can refer back after 6 months if child still needs support.

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