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Whole School Reading Scheme


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#1 H

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 08:37 PM

Hi there everyone,

We are having a big push on reading at school and have to the conclusion that the home school reading scheme that we use (Ginn 360 - I remember reading this at school, when i was little) is not very inspiring so we are looking to find something to replace it with and have been asked to put the feelers out and ask what other people are using and how useful, effective and most of all enjoyable it is.

Thanks

Sarah xoxoxo

#2 tinkerbell

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 08:51 PM

From our recent training on the new framework It would seem you need to think of the 2 strands

a phonic reading scheme that will support your phonic work and high frequency word work and
a reading scheme that is full of rich vocab and illustrations and the children can use comprehension skills.

Apparantly we should be doing two group reading sessions a week with a clear focus or either of these.

By the time the children leave KS1 they should have left the phonic scheme and be on the comprehension one.
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#3 Marion

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 08:52 PM

Rigby Rockets and Big Cat my children love them especially the boys we are also looking at Songbirds? OUP
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#4 kermit21

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 09:47 PM

We use Oxford Reading Tree but I've asked about songbirds too as it's more phonic based. We do have other remnants of schemes in school that we dip into for children who may need different approaches

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#5 Moose

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 07:54 PM

We had a big push on reading last year. We have bought a selection of phonic based books ('Jelly and Bean', 'Songbirds' and the Ruth Miskin series). We also had a reading book 'amnesty' where we collected all the reading scheme books that were in the school (you'll probably be surprised how many there are!) and amalgamated them, drawing roughly on the Cliff Moon bookbands. We now have 10 coloured shelves with approximate reading ages: getting started, 5 - 5.6, 5.6 - 6, 6 - 6.6...We also supplemented the scheme books with 'real' books so there are lots to choose from on each shelf. This has been the best thing we've done for a long time. Children actually WANT to read now because they're free to choose from a wide selection of texts, they can return to books they've enjoyed, and they now don't get stuck on schemes that don't 'grab' them.

When the children start in Reception they choose from the 'getting started' shelf. When we start on phonics they are also given bags of letters which we use for segmenting and blending. When they start to get skilled with this then they move on to the phonics books which run alongside the other scheme. Hopefully this way the children will get the best of both worlds: phonics and texts with richer, more natural language.

We've also introduced a set of levelled bookmarks which focus on the higher level reading skills. These are written in child-speak and have been useful in focusing children on 'what-you-need-to-work-on-next-in-order-to-improve'. For example, the Level 1 bookmark has statements like: 'I can talk about pictures in books: noticing lots of detail, describing what I see and saying what might happen next' or 'I can find and name these things: book, front cover, back cover, page, word, title' whilst the one for Level 5 includes statements like 'I recognise the difference between formal and informal language and the effect that these have on the reader'.

Does that make any sense? Reading back through it I fear not! Sorry!
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#6 Susan

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 08:07 PM

Perfect sense, moose!

I have used the real book/ book bands and prefer to use a scheme whereby the children see a core vocab regularly. We introduced Rigby Star and Rigby Rockets which the children enjoyed. They have a large core of key words and as such were reasonably phonically decodable.
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#7 Marion

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 11:33 AM

Wondered if anyone had seen the website from Reading Rockets there seems to be some good resources/information/links and information leaflets for parents to download.
http://www.readingro...CFR8EEAodTS6yPQ

Edited by Marion, 20 February 2007 - 11:34 AM.

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#8 Lorna

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 01:05 PM

We use 'sound start' as a beginning nice and phonetic and lots of repetition we also use ORT and Story world.... I have a few New Way books that I also use.

We also use the banding system and the children are free to choose an extra book or 2 to take home alongside their guided reading book... The children enjoy the element of choice but we also have structure with the guided reading books.

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