Jump to content

Early Years General Archives

Emotion Coaching -a new approach to supporting...

Dec 12 2013 03:55 PM | Helen in Early Years General

In Part 1 we saw how Emotion Coaching offers a relational model for supporting children’s behaviour.  We compared Emotion Coaching to traditional behaviourist approaches and also to other styles of managing children’s behavior, such as a disapproving or dismissing approach.  We saw how Emotion Coaching offers a powerful way to connect with young children’s emotional state and helps them to manage their own feelings and desires – to learn to self-regulate their behaviour internally rather than relying on extrinsic rewards or sanctions to modify their behavior.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:

Cozolino, L. (2006) The Neuroscience of Human Relationships: Attachment And the Developing Social Brain.  London: Norton & Co.

Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.

Gottman, J. & DeClaire, J. (1997) The Heart of Parenting: How to raise an emotionally intelligent child. New York: Fireside.

Gottman, J.M., Katz, L.F. and Hooven, C. (1996) Parental meta-emotion philosophy and the emotional life of families: theoretical models and preliminary data. Journal of Family Psychology, 10.3, 243-68.

Rose, J. and Rogers, S. (2012) The Role of the Adult in Early Years Settings. Milton Keynes: OPUP.

Rose, J., Gilbert, L. & Smith, H. (2012) ‘Affective teaching and the affective dimensions of learning’ in Ward, S. (ed) A Student’s Guide to Education Studies. London: Routledge.

author: Janet Rose
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Emotion Coaching- a new approach to supporting...

Dec 05 2013 03:49 PM | Helen in Early Years General

This article, by Dr Janet Rose from Bath Spa University, draws attention to a growing base of research evidence which suggests that a ‘relational’ rather than a ‘behavioural’ approach to supporting young children’s learning and behaviour is likely to facilitate the development of better self-regulation and social functioning.  Such an approach operates to create ‘internal’ mechanisms within the brain.  An approach that encapsulates this more affective and effective way of managing behaviour is called ‘Emotion Coaching’. It reflects the evidence that the most successful programmes, in terms of improving behaviour for learning, are those that focus on the emotional and social causes of difficult to manage behaviour and proactively teach social and emotional competencies.  It is also supported by recent findings from neuroscience.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:

Cozolino, L. (2006) The Neuroscience of Human Relationships: Attachment And the Developing Social Brain.  London: Norton & Co.

Goleman, D. (1995) Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.

Gottman, J. & DeClaire, J. (1997) The Heart of Parenting: How to raise an emotionally intelligent child. New York: Fireside.

Gottman, J.M., Katz, L.F. and Hooven, C. (1996) Parental meta-emotion philosophy and the emotional life of families: theoretical models and preliminary data. Journal of Family Psychology, 10.3, 243-68.

Rose, J. and Rogers, S. (2012) The Role of the Adult in Early Years Settings. Milton Keynes: OPUP.

Rose, J., Gilbert, L. & Smith, H. (2012) ‘Affective teaching and the affective dimensions of learning’ in Ward, S. (ed) A Student’s Guide to Education Studies. London: Routledge.

author: Janet Rose
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

The Role of the Adult in Early Years Settings:...

Jul 16 2013 03:03 PM | Helen in Early Years General

Part 2 continues the journey of exploring our role in supporting young children’s learning and development.  It outlines the five remaining ‘selves’ of the ‘plural practitioner’ framework that encompass this role.  The ‘plural practitioner’ framework is offered as a useful vehicle for enabling us to clarify our role in the day to day interactions with children that occur throughout our practice.  It offers a way forward in helping us to minimize any uncertainty about whether ‘to intervene’ or ‘not to intervene’ in children’s play.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Janet Rose
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

The Role of the Adult in Early Years Settings:...

Jun 25 2013 03:02 PM | Helen in Early Years General

Janet Rose, Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Bath Spa University, explores the many different ways in which adults interact with young children in early years settings.  Research demonstrates that the heart of quality practice lies within the interactions that take place between adults and young children and reveals how, in a typical day, early years practitioners might have over 1000 ‘interpersonal interactions’ with children.  The process of this interactive engagement between adults and children is explored through a framework known as the ‘plural practitioner’.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Janet Rose
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Thinking Approaches for the Reflective Professi...

Mar 01 2013 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Our aim as professionals is to achieve better outcomes for children, families and the community. We want to provide effective learning experiences for the children in our care, and strive for continuous quality improvement, but also want to ensure personal and professional development. With this shared understanding and vision of the early years, reflection, through adopting certain thinking approaches, is the tool that supports us to achieve this. Ruksana Mohammed, Lecturer in Early Childhood Studies at the University of East London identifies some effective processes we can adopt to develop our skills of reflection.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Ruksana Mohammed
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Exploring practitioners' understanding of q...

Feb 13 2013 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Michelle Cottle is a senior lecturer in early childhood studies at the University of Roehampton. Her article discusses some of the issues that may shape early years practitioners’ understandings of ‘quality’ within the context of their particular settings. It draws on data from a project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (2009). Michelle discusses the two distinct ways of understanding 'quality': as a locally-determined, changing and dynamic process for each individual setting, or as a static 'target', externally defined and imposed by statutory frameworks and regulations.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Michelle Cottle
co_author:
membercheck: No
featured article:
featured article text: ‘Quality’ has attained a common-sense status in current public and policy debates about early years services and it is largely associated with national goals, standards and targets. Tanner & colleagues (2006) refer to this as an ‘official’ definition of quality predicated on it being something objective that can be measured and evaluated. All the practitioners in the Understanding Quality project referred to these ‘official’ measures, for example Ofsted inspections and children’s attainments against the Foundation Stage profile. These were viewed as an indicator of ‘quality’, especially if a ‘Good’ or ‘Outstanding’ grade was achieved in an inspection, but they were not always an end goal. Practitioners also discussed less tangible aspects in terms of the experiences they aimed to provide for the children, relationships with parents and the wider community as well as with the children and each other. In fact most felt that quality provision was impossible without positive relationships founded on mutual trust, shared values and a common purpose. They tended to speak of these in aspirational terms, feeling that they were working towards it rather than having achieved it. This supports the idea of quality as a process - something people do – although they recognised the integral role of structural factors, for example resources, physical space and funding, in providing the conditions for these processes.

Broadly speaking, there seemed to be two distinct ways of understanding ‘quality’: as a locally-determined, dynamic process; or as a target, something to be achieved but essentially static and defined by statutory frameworks and regulations. Tanner and colleagues (2006) argue that there is room for both and that the ‘official’ approach could be viewed as a useful starting point in the quality-defining process (ensuring equality of access to services, for example) upon which a more flexible, collaborative and inclusive approach can be built.
Read story →    0 comments   

Giving children feedback about their learning

Nov 27 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

How do we give effective feedback to children about what they have learned and what they might do next? Here, Sue Ridgway discusses how to involve children in evaluating their learning and planning future experiences.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Sue Ridgway
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Small Steps: supporting engaged fatherhood

Sep 24 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Chris Randall, an EYP in Brighton, explains how he has worked to develop the relationships between his setting and the children's fathers.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Chris Randall
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Early Years 2012 Conference: June 19th, 2012

Jun 25 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Helen Edwards attended the recent govnet event, featuring Sarah Teather, Liz Bayram, Ann Gross, Sue Robb, Liz Elsom, Cathy Nutbrown, and Dame Clare Tickell. Here is a summary of the main issues discussed.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Helen Edwards
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Nature Deficit Disorder

May 05 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Have you heard of the phrase ‘Nature deficit disorder’? Just recently there have been lots of reports, book releases, news articles, and interviews on TV and radio about the need to reconnect children to nature. Many of our children’s lives are well organised by well intentioned parents going from one adult led activity to the next e.g. school to football to drama class to ballet where they often don’t need to do much creative thinking for themselves. They live an over-scheduled, over-organised childhood. Here, Helen Irving shares with us a summary of recent reports on the subject of children's lack of engagement with nature.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Helen Irving
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Early years settings and social media

May 03 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

In the last few years the use of social media has grown rapidly. It is now estimated that 65% of all adult Internet users access some form of social networking site. The most well known of the social networking sites are Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter. Written by Kathy Brodie, this article gives a brief explanation of the uses for each of the different sites and their unique qualities. There is a discussion about the benefits of using social media for nurseries and practitioners, and also the pitfalls we should be mindful of. It is concluded with some recommendations for good practice.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Kathy Brodie
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Persona Dolls

Feb 04 2012 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

How can we use Persona Dolls to support children's understanding of equality and to celebrate diversity? Here, Juliet Mickelburgh gives us ideas on how to introduce the dolls to children and their families, and explains the benefits of including them in your setting.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Juliet Mickelburgh
co_author:
membercheck: No
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Positive Behaviour Management

Nov 11 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

What do we mean by "good behaviour"? We are often quite clear about the behaviour that we don't want to see in our settings! Can we be proactive about this and plan consistent positive behaviour strategies where all children feel happy and secure and want to demonstrate that "good behaviour", however we define it?

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Helen Edwards
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Challenging Mathematics in the Early Years

Jun 27 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

A common perception among the general public is that it is easy to teach young children mathematics. In this article, Professor Anne Cockburn, from the School of Education & Lifelong Learning at the University of East Anglia, discusses some of the potential pitfalls one may encounter in such an undertaking thus illustrating why early years' mathematics education is a rather more complex process than it might first appear.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Anne D. Cockburn
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Partnership with Parents, Part 2.

Apr 25 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

This is the second of two articles looking at building partnerships with parents. Here we discuss how settings can open up to parents and families to achieve true partnership.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Juliet Mickelburgh
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Partnerships with Parents, Part 1

Mar 10 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Working in partnership with parents is now considered to be one of the key areas of good early years practice, illustrated by the focussing of four Standards in the EYPS on this subject. In the first of two articles we look at why partnership with parents is so important, with the following article exploring how to establish successful partnership.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Juliet Mickelburgh
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

It's Good to get Global! Global citizenship in...

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

A well-referenced article, with resources and activity suggestions for introducing young children to the wider world of global citizenship.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Kate Lea
co_author: Oxfam Development Education
membercheck: No
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Early Childhood - A Zambian perspective: Part 1

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

A wonderful and personal perspective on the cultural philosophy and attitudes towards early childhood in Zambia.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Jenny Kane
co_author: Mundia
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Early Childhood - a Zambian perspective: Part 2

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Part 2 of this article describes how young children in Zambian villages spend their days.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Mundia
co_author: Jenny Kane
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Foundation Stage Units Part 1: developing integ...

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

An overview of the differing types of FSU from an experienced early years professional and author, giving pros, cons and issues around the subject.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Anne O'Connor
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Foundation Stage Units Part 2 – experiences and...

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Following her first well received first article on Foundation Stage Units, Anne discusses in more depth her experiences and the lessons learned of the set up of her unit.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Anne O'Connor
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Applying for a job in Early Years? Interview pr...

Jan 24 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Getting through interviews successfully is all about preparation. This article guides the interviewee through the process, recommending strategies for impressing your interviewer.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Helen Edwards
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

Men in Early Childhood Education: Why we are wh...

Jan 18 2011 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Richard Harty outlines the current issues concerning men in the early years workforce and describes the outcome of the first "Men in Early Childhood" summit in New Zealand.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Richard Harty
co_author:
membercheck: No
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments   

What's Critical About Critical Thinking?

Dec 16 2010 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

Joy Chalke, principal lecturer in the School of Education and Continuing Studies at the University of Portsmouth, demonstrates and analyses some of the critical thinking skills required of students engaged in higher education courses.



secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:

Brown, G. and Wragg, E.C. (1993). Questioning. London: Routledge.
Cottrell (2005). Critical Thinking Skills Developing Effective Analysis and Argument. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
Ennis, R. (1996). Critical Thinking. Uppersaddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Fisher, A. (2001). Critical Thinking: An Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Fleetham, M. (2006). Unpublished seminar notes. Retrieved from:
www.thinkingclassroom.co.uk
Halpern, D. (1996). Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence
Harper-Marinick, M. (2001). Thinking critically about critical thinking. In mcli Forum
volume 2. Retrieved 11 November 2006, from: http://mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/forum/
Kyriacou, C. (1997). Effective Teaching in Schools (2nd edition). Cheltenham: STP.
Melville Jones, H.E. and Haynes, B.T. (1999). Teaching Thinking Skills: Mapping the
arguments for curriculum choices revisited
. Retrieved 2 January 2007, from:
www.aare.edu.au/99pap/mel99174.htm
Moon, J. (2005). We seek it here... a new perspective on the elusive practice of critical thinking: a theoretical and practical approach. Bristol: HEA/Escalate.
Morgan, N. and Saxton, J. (1991). Teaching, Questioning and Learning. London: Routledge.
Paul, R. and Elder, L. (2006). Critical Thinking Tools for Taking Charge of Your Learning and Your Life. (pxvii) New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
University of Canberra (n.d.). What do we mean by critical thinking? Retrieved October
2006, from: http://webct.port.ac...ipts/serve_home

author: Joy Chalke
co_author:
membercheck: Yes
featured article:
featured article text: Starting any form of Higher Education is a huge leap for most practitioners and along with the general concerns about issues like time management and referencing there is also a requirement to get to grips with what the lecturers mean when they use specific terminology. The request to think critically, or demonstrate critical thinking, is the essence of Higher Education (University of Canberra, n.d.) and in my experience of teaching on a foundation degree in early years for over 8 years, it causes students a lot of confusion. This is often because it is likely to have a specific meaning in academic circles, which is not related to how it is used in everyday life. Study skills books don't always seem to help clarify the issue with definitions such as:

"Critical thinking is the art of thinking about thinking while thinking in order to
make thinking better" (Paul and Elder, 2006, p.xvii),

which seem to suggest that critical thinking can be a complex and difficult matter.

Concerned about how to help our students, my colleagues and I embarked upon a project to identify the thinking skills, we believe, combine to create a 'critical thinker' on our type of course.
Read story →    0 comments   

Signing with Children

Dec 16 2010 12:00 AM | Guest in Early Years General

In April 2009, Milkshake Montessori Nursery School introduced signing into the setting following
the "Signing with Babies and Young Children" accredited CPD course. The achievements made by children, parents/carers and early years practitioners have been impressive, rewarding and inspiring. Here, Geraldine Hill describes the theory behind the methodology.

secondary title:
introductory paragraph:
references:
author: Geraldine Hill
co_author:
membercheck: No
featured article:
featured article text:
Read story →    0 comments